Sudbury, Massachusetts

Susan Maranhao

Susan Maranhao

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Sudbury, Massachusetts

Sudbury Plaza,
513A Boston Post Road, Rte. 20
Sudbury, MA 01776

Phone: (978) 443-1739
Fax: (978) 443-1430
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sun: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Comments:
Located between Shaw's Supermarket and Starbucks. Celebrating 25 years in Sudbury!

Map This Location
We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Greetings from the folks @ the Sudbury Wild Birds Unlimited® Nature Shop! 

Nature Products Designed by Experts - Trusted Local Advice!

Woodpeckers

Fun Facts About Woodpeckers

  • Considering the pounding it takes, why doesn’t a woodpecker’s bill wear down to a ragged nub? Wear down it does, but special cells on the end of the bill are constantly replacing the lost material. This keeps the chisel-pointed bill strong and resilient, while actually allowing it to be sharpened with every blow.
  • Woodpeckers use their stiff tail feathers for extra support when digging for insects or hollowing out a nest in a tree.
  • A woodpecker’s pointed tail feathers are especially strong and rigid. The tail bone, lower vertebrae and the tail’s supporting muscles are also large in comparison to other birds. These modifications allow a woodpecker’s tail to serve as a prop that supports their weight as they climb and cling to trees.
  • Woodpeckers rarely climb down trees, their stiff tail feathers and relatively short legs are much better adapted for climbing upward instead of down.
  • The contrasting black and white pattern found on the backs of many woodpeckers helps to conceal them from predators. Known as disruptive coloration, this sharp contrast in colors helps to break-up and conceal the shape and outline of a woodpecker as it climbs the side of a tree.
  • The barbed tip of a woodpecker’s tongue is very sensitive to touch and can both detect and impale insect larvae. The tongue is coated with sticky mucus that is secreted by large salivary glands; this coating helps to ensure that its prey does not slip away.
  • Most woodpeckers’ tongues are two to three times longer than their bills.
  • The base of some woodpeckers’ long, retractable tongues reach entirely around the back and top of the skull and end behind the right eye socket.
  • To prevent small bits of debris from entering their nostrils while excavating trees, woodpeckers have tufts of stiff feathers growing over both nostrils.
  • Woodpeckers have a third eyelid to help protect their eyes from debris while drilling into trees.
  • Woodpeckers have a thicker skin than most other birds, an adaptation that has probably evolved from their constant contact with the rough bark of trees.

 

Adult and Juvenile Downy WoodpeckersWoodpecker Family Activities

Families opting to stay close to home this summer won’t have to travel any farther than their backyards for fun and entertainment. Across the country, adult woodpeckers are introducing their young fledglings to a whole new world of experiences.

People who only feed the birds during the winter miss out on summer bird feeding fun and fascinating wild bird ‘family life’ activities. By mid-summer, woodpecker fledglings begin leaving the nest and are fed and taught to eat from feeders by their parents; a fascinating interaction to observe.

The health and growth rate of a fledgling is determined by the amount of nutritional foods it consumes. High-protein and high-calcium foods are especially important until a bird is full grown. Fledglings require a lot of protein to help them grow strong, properly-colored feathers and strong flight muscles.

Help your birds with high-protein foods like mealworms, peanuts, Jim's Birdacious® Bark Butter® and suet. These energy-packed foods will entice your birds and their young back to your yard. The young birds will learn the location of your bird food and begin to make return trips on their own.

You can recognize Downy and other woodpecker fledglings by their fresh and dapper plumage, whereas that of the adults is worn and dusky from their repeated trips in and out of the nest cavity.

After a few weeks, the parents stop feeding their fledglings and may even peck at them if they persist in begging for food to get them to feed themselves.

With lots of young woodpeckers around and the molting process in full swing, woodpeckers are seeking the extra calories and proteins that feeders can provide.

Visit us soon and we’ll make sure you have the expert advice and quality hobby products you need to make friends with some of the cutest birds in the neighborhood.

Eastern Bluebirds Nesting in a Natural Cavity

How to Attract Bluebirds with Food

How to Accessorize Your Advanced Pole System®

How to Create a Bird Feeding Station - Advanced Pole System® 2 Minute Challenge

___________________________________________________________________________________

 

Birds love our exclusive seed cylinders and no-melt suet cylinders. Unfortunately, so do many nimble, furry backyard inhabitants.

Well, no more! We've added some heat to our bird food cylinders. While birds such as chickadees, titmice and nuthatches readily eat foods containing hot pepper, pesky critters will shy away from them.

For best results, use a cylinder feeder with a roof to prevent the hot pepper from being washed off or diluted by the weather. 

 Attracting Birds To A New Feeder

Finch FeederWhat's the best way to attract birds to a new feeder? There isn't a perfect answer for this question, but it's one we get a lot! There are times when you put up a new bird feeder and birds come to it within minutes. And, other times it can take months for the birds to come. You may notice the birds fly by a feeder and stop in mid-air as if to say "whoa, new feeder alert, turn back!"

Give the birds time to find the feeder and get used to its presence in your yard. Make sure the birds can see the feeder, as they find their food by sight. Try putting some seed on the ground or near the feeder. Above all, be patient!

 Bird Feeding: A Hobby for All Seasons

How good are our seed blends? So good, Martha Stewart has tasted them!

Red-breasted Nuthatch on Peanut FeederOur blends may be tasty enough for the "Domestic Diva," but, they can't overcome nature and disrupt birds' normal routines.

See, there's some sort of urban myth that says people should not feed the birds year-round because it will make them lazy or too dependent on food offered at feeders.

In truth, there's no reason, or season, you should stop feeding your birds. After all, food offered at feeders only makes up about 10 to 20% of a bird's diet.

During winter, food is scarce and birds fed in these harsh months are more likely to survive to raise their young in the spring.

Birds that are fed during nesting season spend less time away from their nests looking for food.

During summer, many food sources are still growing and providing food allows birds to teach their fledglings where and how to feed. In the fall, you can provide food for migrating birds and help over-wintering birds prep for the tough months ahead.

Birds with year-round access to abundant food supplies, such as backyard feeders, can spend more time doing activities that enhance their health like preening, nesting, molting and being more alert of predators.

So stop by the store for the best prices on the best bird food in town. We will help you enjoy your birds more and make their lives a bit easier, and that's a very good thing.

Variety is the Spice of Bird Feeding

Peanut Feeder

Bird feeding has come a long way since its primitive beginning in the late 1800s.

In those days, bird feeding enthusiasts could only offer some waste grains swept up from a hay-loft, bits of suet or pork fat nailed to a tree or maybe a few table crumbs placed on a tree stump.

Today, thanks to decades of observation and research, the menu available to your backyard birds is the most diverse, highest quality ever offered.

This broad selection of foods has been developed specifically to attract a wider variety of birds to your feeders and provide the most beneficial foods to meet birds' nutritional needs.

Peanuts, being relatively new to the bird feeding menu, are a great example. They are nutritionally high in protein and fat while being very attractive to a broad array of woodland and backyard birds.

Since the 1990s, mealworms have dramatically grown in popularity because of their ability to draw insect-loving birds, such as bluebirds, wrens, catbirds and even certain warblers into the backyard.

Then there's Jim's Birdacious® Bark Butter® — no other single food is known to attract more birds. More than 76 species have been observed feeding on this nutritious, spreadable suet.

So embrace these advances in bird food. They will attract an exciting new variety of birds to your yard, while providing them with much better nourishment than the foods our ancestors scraped together more than 100 years ago.