Sudbury, Massachusetts

Susan Maranhao

Susan Maranhao

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Sudbury, Massachusetts

Sudbury Plaza,
513A Boston Post Road, Rte. 20
Sudbury, MA 01776

Phone: (978) 443-1739
Fax: (978) 443-1430
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sun: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Comments:
Located between Shaw's Supermarket and Starbucks.

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We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Greetings from the folks @ the Sudbury Wild Birds Unlimited® Nature Shop! 

Feeder Swap

Do you have a bird feeder that has seen better days? A feeder that has birds thinking twice before they visit? Well, trade up during our Feeder Swap. We offer a variety of feeders, and we can help you find the one that will accommodate the birds in your yard.

Any repairable feeders will be donated to local schools and nature centers.

Trade in an Old Feeder; get 20% Off a New One*

*Valid only at the participating store(s) listed. One discount per purchase. Not valid with other discounts or previous purchases. Offer starts now & expires 9/14/14.

             Feed 'Em or Defeat 'Em

Red Squirrel on Double Vision

They may have a reputation for making bird feeding less enjoyable, however, squirrels aren’t going away any time soon. Perhaps by looking at them from a different perspective, you can begin to appreciate, if not enjoy, squirrels and their behaviors.

Squirrels are one of the most curious and adaptable animals to be found anywhere and they are unmatched in their problem-solving ability to defeat many so-called "squirrel proof" feeders!

Squirrels can jump up to five feet vertically and ten feet betw

een trees or structures. They have the ability to cling from objects with their back foot toes (with support from their tail) which allows them to hang upside-down and eat.

They certainly keep our Certified Bird Feeding Specialists on their toes in order to provide you with the latest and greatest advice on how to keep your bird food and feeders safe from these rascally rodents!

So, if you want to keep squirrels from bothering your bird feeding setup, we have the foods, feeders and accessories to confuse and confound even the most brilliant squirrel in your neighborhood.

And if you decide to raise the white flag and enjoy their amazing antics, we have lots of fun and functional squirrel feeders that will brighten up both their day and yours, too.

Visit us soon, and we’ll help you feed the squirrels if that’s your thing, or we’ll help you defeat ’em once and for all.

Bird Bathing, Dusting or Anting

Q: I have seen birds “bathing” in the dust at the end of my driveway. Sometimes I think I see them putting ants in their feathers. What are they doing?

They are “anting” and taking a dust bath. Researchers have documented this alternative bathing or “anting” in more than 200 species of birds. Anting rids or reduces external parasites and can soothe skin irritations. Dust bathing may reduce moisture, align feather barbs and remove external parasites. Birds also will bathe in the sun when they drop their wings and spread their tails. This also may help increase their body temperature.

Cats and Bird Watching

Your cat would probably love to be one of the many cats allowed to roam outside stalking the songbirds and other wildlife that cats eat every year. You may find it hard to believe your sweet kitty would ever catch a bird. If she did, she probably wouldn't eat it. She’d probably just play with it and leave it on your doorstep to show off her great catch.

Cats kill billions of songbirds each year, and for that reason you should never allow your kitty outside. It’s also healthier for her to remain inside the house. The American Bird Conservancy has developed a campaign – called Cats Indoors! – to educate cat owners about the damage their pets can do to songbirds, other wildlife and themselves by freely roaming the outdoors.

For more information, visit http://www.abcbirds.org/cats/catsindoors.htm

Are You A "Responsible" Bird Feeder?

HabitatIf you enjoy feeding and watching your backyard birds, then you probably want to do as much as you can to practice your hobby safely and ensure the birds’ overall health and well-being. Just as people can catch colds or other illnesses from people who are sick, birds that feed at crowded or dirty feeders have the potential to develop diseases that are harmful to them.

While the incidence of birds falling ill from feeders is small compared to other natural hazards birds face, there are things you can do to help your birds stay healthy:

 

  • Provide multiple feeding stations in different areas of your yard to disperse bird activity.
  • Provide seed from a bird feeder rather than scattering it on the ground.
  • Keep areas clean under and around your feeders.
  • Keep fresh seed in the feeder and be sure it doesn’t get moldy.
  • Clean your bird feeders regularly with a solution of one part bleach and 10 parts water. 

 

For other tips or questions, stop by our store and talk to one of our Certified Birdfeeding Specialists.

 Attracting Birds To A New Feeder

Finch FeederWhat's the best way to attract birds to a new feeder? There isn't a perfect answer for this question, but it's one we get a lot! There are times when you put up a new bird feeder and birds come to it within minutes. And, other times it can take months for the birds to come. You may notice the birds fly by a feeder and stop in mid-air as if to say "whoa, new feeder alert, turn back!"

Give the birds time to find the feeder and get used to its presence in your yard. Make sure the birds can see the feeder, as they find their food by sight. Try putting some seed on the ground or near the feeder. Above all, be patient!

 

 

 

 

 Bird Feeding: A Hobby for All Seasons

How good are our seed blends? So good, Martha Stewart has tasted them!

Red-breasted Nuthatch on Peanut FeederOur blends may be tasty enough for the "Domestic Diva," but, they can't overcome nature and disrupt birds' normal routines.

See, there's some sort of urban myth that says people should not feed the birds year-round because it will make them lazy or too dependent on food offered at feeders.

In truth, there's no reason, or season, you should stop feeding your birds. After all, food offered at feeders only makes up about 10 to 20% of a bird's diet.

During winter, food is scarce and birds fed in these harsh months are more likely to survive to raise their young in the spring.

Birds that are fed during nesting season spend less time away from their nests looking for food.

During summer, many food sources are still growing and providing food allows birds to teach their fledglings where and how to feed. In the fall, you can provide food for migrating birds and help over-wintering birds prep for the tough months ahead.

Birds with year-round access to abundant food supplies, such as backyard feeders, can spend more time doing activities that enhance their health like preening, nesting, molting and being more alert of predators.

So stop by the store for the best prices on the best bird food in town. We will help you enjoy your birds more and make their lives a bit easier, and that's a very good thing.

Variety is the Spice of Bird Feeding

Peanut Feeder

Bird feeding has come a long way since its primitive beginning in the late 1800s.

In those days, bird feeding enthusiasts could only offer some waste grains swept up from a hay-loft, bits of suet or pork fat nailed to a tree or maybe a few table crumbs placed on a tree stump.

Today, thanks to decades of observation and research, the menu available to your backyard birds is the most diverse, highest quality ever offered.

This broad selection of foods has been developed specifically to attract a wider variety of birds to your feeders and provide the most beneficial foods to meet birds' nutritional needs.

Peanuts, being relatively new to the bird feeding menu, are a great example. They are nutritionally high in protein and fat while being very attractive to a broad array of woodland and backyard birds.

Since the 1990s, mealworms have dramatically grown in popularity because of their ability to draw insect-loving birds, such as bluebirds, wrens, catbirds and even certain warblers into the backyard.

Then there's Jim's Birdacious® Bark Butter® — no other single food is known to attract more birds. More than 76 species have been observed feeding on this nutritious, spreadable suet.

So embrace these advances in bird food. They will attract an exciting new variety of birds to your yard, while providing them with much better nourishment than the foods our ancestors scraped together more than 100 years ago.